Fighting On Film: Men In War (1957)

This week we return to Korea. Following on from our look at ‘A Hill In Korea‘ a couple of weeks ago, in this episode we discuss ‘Men in War‘ (1957). Based on Van Van Praag’s 1949 novel ‘Day Without End‘ and directed by Anthony Mann, ‘Men in War‘ follows a platoon of US soldiers which have been cut off by sudden North Korean advances. They must fight their way to their objective. Starring Robert Ryan and Aldo Ray, tension rises throughout the film climaxing with a hard fought infantry battle to take an enemy held hill.

The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the films:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm and check out the new Fighting On Film website here.

Thanks for listening!

Fighting On Film: 633 Squadron

Join us this week as we slip on our flight suits, climb into our cockpits and fire up our Mosquitos for 1964’s 633 Squadron. The squadron is tasked with a secret mission to destroy an enemy factory. The film is based on a book by Frederick E. Smith and stars Cliff Robertson, George Chakiris, Harry Andrews and Angus Lennie. 

The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the films:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm and check out our new website www.FightingOnFilm.com

Thanks for listening!

Fighting On Film: A Hill In Korea (1956)

This week marks the 70th anniversary of the Battle of the Imjin River. To commemorate this we look the only film to be made about the British Army’s experience during the Korean War 1956’s A Hill In Korea (Also known as Hell In Korea). The film features a stellar cast including Stanley Baker, Harry Andrews, Robert Shaw, George Baker, Harry Landis and a young Michael Caine in his first film role.

The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the films:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm

Thanks for listening!

Fighting On Film: The Diary of an Unknown Soldier (1959) & The Forgotten Faces (1960)

This week we look at two of acclaimed British director Peter Watkins’ formative amateur films: The Diary of an Unknown Soldier (1959) & The Forgotten Faces (1960). Perhaps best known for his later 1964 film Culloden and 1965’s ground-breaking nuclear war film The War Game. These two early films are especially fascinating as you can see Watkin’s distinct style develop through them.

The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the films:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm

Thanks for listening!

Fighting On Film: A Bridge Too Far (1977) Ft. Al Murray

This week we tackle a true classic, Richard Attenborough’s ‘A Bridge Too Far‘, with some help from renowned comedian and history buff Al Murray. Al joined us to talk about one of his (and our) favourite war films. With a truly stellar cast the film takes on the epic story of Operation Market Garden. Join us as we leap from a Dakota and push on to the bridge!

The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the film:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm

Thanks for listening!

Fighting On Film: The Dogs of War (1980)

Vic joins Matt and Robbie to bring Fighting On Film’s Merc Month to a close looking at a classic of the genre, ‘The Dogs of War’ staring Christopher Walken & Tom Berenger. Directed by John Irvin and with cinematography from the legendary Jack Cardiff it adapts Frederick Forsyths book about a mercenary led coup in a fictional African republic of Zangaro!

The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the film:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm

Thanks for listening!

Fighting On Film: Commando (1985)

Zip up your combat jackets & load up your ammo belts! Today we dive into 1985’s Commando starring none other than Arnold Schwarzenegger! The cult classic is chock full of action and macho bravado. It still entertains over 30 years later!

The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the film:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm

Thanks for listening!

Fighting On Film: SAS: Red Notice (2021)

Merc Month continues with SAS: Red Notice as brand new film about mercenaries who highjack the ‘Eurostream’ train. Based on a book by SAS veteran Andy McNab it stars Sam Heughan, Ruby Rose and Andy Serkis. We watched it so you don’t have to, be warned there is some exasperated swearing. This was a bit of an unplanned added bonus for Merc Month.

The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the film:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm

Thanks for listening!

Bring Up The PIAT Pt.II

So you may have seen our earlier video looking at the portrayal of PIATs in the 1978 classic A Bridge Too Far! If not check it out.

When I think of Richard Attenborough’s all-star war epic telling the story of Operation Market Garden, I immediately think of the iconic ‘BRING UP THE PIAT’ scene where Anthony Hopkins playing Colonel John Frost commanding 2 PARA calls for the Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank to take out a marauding ‘Panther’.

But this isn’t the only scene from the film depicting the PIAT! In this video we’ll look at a couple of the other scenes showing the PIAT in action.

We first see the PIAT during the scene when the Guards Armoured Division’s spearhead meets heavy german resistance. Michael Caine’s Sherman’s get a pasting from some Pak 40s. The British infantry deploys and we see a cornucopia of kit ranging from Brens to Vickers to an M2 Browning. But blink and you’ll miss them a pair of PIAT teams also ‘bring up the PIAT’. A two man team can be seen moving forward, the No.1 carrying the PIAT and the No.2 carrying a 3 round bomb carrier, sadly killed by enemy fire.

The second scene in which we see the PIAT finally get to work on some German armoured fighting vehicles is during Gräbner’s attack over the bridge. As the PARAs at the Bridge prepare for the attack we see 2 or 3 PIAT positions get ready – loading bombs into their bomb support trays. One PIAT No.1  can be seen slotting the rear of a PIAT bomb into the projectile guide plates to hold the bomb in place – very authentic.

As the column crosses the Bridge Frost orders his men to open fire, Brens, Stens, Rifle No.4s and PIATs open up and the column is stopped in its tracks. During the scene we see a number of PIAT’s fire and knock out SS vehicles. One PIAT No.2 is hit by enemy fire. The first PIAT round fired hits a lead German vehicle causing it to halt, the second flips a Kubelwagen. We then see a No.2 two load a fresh bomb into the bomb support tray – with a tap to make sure its properly in place. We get a great show of the PIAT firing from the front. It’s worth noting that the PIAT doesn’t recock and the spigot is still seen in the bomb tray just before the camera cuts away. Meaning that that PIAT No.1 will have to recock his weapon before he can fire again!

It’s worth remembering without the ‘Bring Up The PIAT’ scene making a point of naming the weapon, most people would never have known what this unusual weapon that dealt so much damage in the earlier scene was! Of course the attack wasn’t stopped by PIATs alone, there were also airborne anti-tank guns, which the film doesn’t show.

Another little titbit of information I learnt since the first ‘Bring Up The PIAT’ video, thanks to my friend Robbie of RM Military History [check out his channel], is that the PIAT was fired in most of these scenes by one of the film’s armourer Bill Aylmore. The information comes from After the Battle – The Battle of Arnhem – War Film: A Bridge Too Far which describes him as formerly a sergeant with the 50th Regt. – which might be a reference to the Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment. The book goes on to say that “Aylmore excelled himself during the filming of the battle on the bridge by being the ace shot with the PIAT. During all the various takes he was able to put the bomb exactly where the director wanted it and where it coincided with the special effects explosions.” – Good shooting indeed!

Check out more PIAT scene analysis videos here.


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Fighting On Film: Dark of the Sun (1968)

We continue Mercenary Month with a classic, ‘Dark of the Sun’. Jack Cardiff’s 1968 action movie that follows a band of Congolese commandos attempting to retrieve a huge diamond haul before the Simbas arrive. An artistic but visceral film staring Rod Taylor, Yvette Mimieux, Jim Brown, Peter Carsten and Kenneth More. Skilfully shot, lots of impressive action and some good performances combine to create a compelling film.

​The episode is also available on all other podcast platforms, you can find them here.

Here’s some stills from the film:

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm

Thanks for listening!